A Question

2 08 2007

Names like Illinois (I think) and Iroquois are Native American names, right? And I’m just assuming here, but I’m betting they didn’t have the English alphabet until the Europeans came and taught it to them. Right? So why did they spell it all crazy? Why not “Illinnoy” or “Iriquoy”?

I have similar questions regarding certain (OK, most) Celtic words.

Inquiring minds want to know.

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6 responses

2 08 2007
Amy

I concur. Please let me know if you find out the answer. Why did the raping pillaging settlers find a need to put a French spin on these words? I don’t know.

Also…have you ever tried reading POLISH? WTF. WTF, people. That’s why I like Spanish and Italian. You pronounce them JUST like they look.

2 08 2007
ZebraBelly:

I think you may be on to something there, Amy. French people. And I do not, frankly, approve of the logic you’ve brought to this discussion.

Lucky for me, French people cannot explain the Celtic language.

3 08 2007
Amy

And see, that is why my French half doesn’t understand my Irish half. Hee hee.

Gaelic is so, so hard for me to read. I can read some of it, but the rest of it is so. Hard for me. Basically, the words I know are more b/c I’ve memorized how they sound. That language is ridiculously illogical to me, but it’s interesting.

3 08 2007
Anonymous

The French encountered the Algonquian (of Illinois) and Iroquois people long before any English settlers. I guess the names are the colonial version of planting a flag on the moon. 🙂

3 08 2007
Princesse Ecossaise

Waaaaaaaaa! I want your header it looks so great!

I always find myself pondering over why Americans spell things differently from us Brits…or why us Brits spell things differently from Americans…like ‘Mum’ ‘Mom’ and ‘colour’ ‘color’ and…etc etc! It gets me a little confused!

3 08 2007
Mee-ha

I was just going to say what Amy said. My state can’t spell anything phoenetically. Sault Ste Marie and Ypsilanti ho! FWIW, Russian is basically phonetic as well. 🙂

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